Blog

7 Ways to Cut 50 Calories Every Day

Small adjustments can add up to diet success

(HealthDay News) -- Did you know that eating an extra 50

iStock 86002859 SMALL

 calories a day can sneak on about five pounds a year? But trimming the same number calories will put the trend in reverse.

Cutting out 50 (or more) calories a d

ay isn't as hard as you think, says registered dietitian Rachel Begun. Start with your daily coffee. Skip the sugar, and flavor your java with vanilla extract or cinnamon instead. Replace that pat of butter on your morning toast with a teaspoon of jam.

At lunch, make tuna or salmon salad with low-fat vinaigrette instead of full-fat mayo. When ordering a salad, ask for a non-creamy dressing on the side, but resist the temptation to use it all -- about half is all you really need.

Downsize that glass of wine before dinner from 5 to 3 ounces. Add a splash of seltzer to extend 

it.

Cooking with olive or sesame oil is healthy, but go easy -- every tablespoon has 120 calories. Measure out a half-tablespoon instead so that you won't use too much of a good thing. Save even more by switching to an oil spritzer instead of pouring from the bottle, Begun says.

At 30 calories a tablespoon, barbecue sauce adds unwanted calories to meat. Instead, grill or roast meats with fresh herbs and spices for flavor. Use fat-free (and low-salt) broth when you need to baste.

And don't forget to drink plenty of water. Water keeps you feeling full and your metabolism running in tip-top shape.

HealthDay

Copyright (c) 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

There Are More Ways to Track Weight Loss Success Than the Scale

gaining weight but dont know why thinsculpting(HealthDay News) -- Self-monitoring is part of virtually every weight loss plan, and weighing yourself is a key part of self-monitoring. After all, the one thing every dieter wants to see is results.

But how can you really tell if you're making progress? The most common method is to step on the scale. Yet a big downside of the scale is that it doesn't tell you how much fat you've lost. Instead, it weighs everything. And that makes it easy for something like drinking more water to cause frustrating weight fluctuations.

Many weight loss plans recommend weighing yourself once a week or less to avoid getting discouraged. Others say weighing yourself every day can help you stay on track and prevent gaining back lost weight. But what if all that stepping on and off the scale just leaves you discouraged?

A great alternative is tracking your progress with a tape measure. Once a week or once a month, measure your bust or chest, waist, hips, thighs, calves, and upper and lower arms.

Another simple way to measure your progress is how your clothes fit. Put on the same pair of pants and shirt every week or month to see how you're doing.  Whichever method you choose, make sure to have realistic goals -- and aim for losing just 1 or 2 pounds a week.

By Joan McClusky, HealthDay Reporter

More information:

For more ideas on body measurements, visit the "tools and calculators" page on the American Council on Exercise website.

Last Updated: May 23, 2017

Exercise Can Help Overcome the Obesity Gene

By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Even if obesity is "in your genes," regular exercise can help keep extra pounds at bay, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when people carried a particular gene variant that raises obesity risk, regular exercise seemedto reduce the effects of their DNA -- by about one-third. The gene in question is known as FTO. Studies show that people with a particular variant of the gene have a heightened risk of obesity.

But the gene's effects are not huge, or written in stone. Research has found that people who carry two copies of the FTO variant (one inherited from each parent) weigh about 6.5 pounds more than non-carriers, on average. The new findings underscore one way to counter the gene's impact: Exercise.

"There are genes that appear to directly impact weight, but the effects are small," said lead researcher Mariaelisa Graff, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "You still have a lot of choice over your behavior." The study results are not exactly surprising, according to Dr. Timothy Church, an obesity researcher who was not involved in the work. "This shows, once again, that genes are not your destiny," said Church. He is a professor of preventative medicine at Louisiana State University's Pennington Biomedical Research Center.

Church said regular exercise is particularly key in preventing excess weight gain in the first place -- and in keeping the pounds off after someone loses weight. Exercise is less effective in helping obese people shed weight, Church said. Diet changes are the critical step there. But the bottom line is that exercise matters, regardless of your genes, according to Dr. Chip Lavie, of the John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, in New Orleans.

 Lavie, who was not involved in the study, pointed to findings from his own research. "[We] have published data that suggests the main cause of increasing obesity over the past five decades is the dramatic decline in physical activity," he said. Gym memberships aside, Americans these days are less active at work, at home (through housework) and during leisure time, according to Lavie. And the benefits of exercise go beyond weight control, he stressed. Physical activity boosts people's fitness levels -- which, Lavie said, is critical in preventing heart disease and living a longer, healthier life.

The new findings are based on over 200,000 adults, mostly of European descent, who'd taken part in previous health studies. Graff and her colleagues analyzed information on their weight and exercise habits, and looked at how those factors "interacted" with 2.5 million gene variants. FTO is the gene that is most strongly linked to obesity, Graff said. And overall, her team found, active people who carried the obesity-linked FTO variant appeared more resistant to its effects than sedentary people.

On average, exercise weakened the variant's effects by about 30 percent, the researchers reported in the April 27 issue of PLOS Genetics. There were some hints that exercise also affected some other weight-related genes. But the only clear relationship was with the FTO variant, according to Graff. That, she noted, could be related to the broad way the study looked at exercise. The 23 percent of people who were least active were considered "inactive," while everyone else was deemed "active." Church said he thinks research into the genetics of body weight will increasingly become useful.

If certain gene variants affect people's response to a low-carb diet or aerobic exercise, for example, that could help in "tailoring" weight-loss plans, he suggested. "The science is rapidly evolving," Church said, "and there's still a lot to learn. But I think that's the direction this is going."

More information: The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more on weight management.

SOURCES: Mariaelisa Graff, Ph.D., research assistant professor, epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Timothy Church, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., professor, preventative medicine, Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge; Chip Lavie, M.D., medical director, cardiac rehabilitation and prevention, and director, exercise laboratories, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, New Orleans; April 27, 2017, PLOS Genetics, online

Last Updated: Apr 27, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Exercise for a better you!!

ThinSculpting can help get rid of pockets of fat with CoolSculpting in our Cary and Wake Forest offices (convenient for Raleigh and the rest of The Triangle area, including Durham, Chapel Hill and Morrisville) but we still encourage a healthy lifestyle with plenty of exercise. Here is a great article about the benefits of regular exercise and physical activity: Exercise: 7 benefits of regular physical activity You know exercise is good for you, but do you know how good? From boosting your mood to improving your sex life, find out how exercise can improve your life. By Mayo Clinic Staff You know exercise is good for you, but do you know how good? From boosting your mood to improving your sex life, find out how exercise can improve your life.Want to feel better, have more energy and even add years to your life? Just exercise.The health benefits of regular exercise and physical activity are hard to ignore. Everyone benefits from exercise, regardless of age, sex or physical ability. Need more convincing to get moving? Check out these seven ways exercise can lead to a happier, healthier you. 1. Exercise controls weight Exercise can help prevent excess weight gain or help maintain weight loss. When you engage in physical activity, you burn calories. The more intense the activity, the more calories you burn. Regular trips to the gym are great, but don't worry if you can't find a large chunk of time to exercise every day. To reap the benefits of exercise, just get more active throughout your day — take the stairs instead of the elevator or rev up your household chores. Consistency is key. 2. Exercise combats health conditions and diseases Worried about heart disease? Hoping to prevent high blood pressure? No matter what your current weight, being active boosts high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good," cholesterol and decreases unhealthy triglycerides. This one-two punch keeps your blood flowing smoothly, which decreases your risk of cardiovascular diseases. Regular exercise helps prevent or manage a wide range of health problems and concerns, including stroke, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, depression, a number of types of cancer, arthritis and falls. 3. Exercise improves mood Need an emotional lift? Or need to blow off some steam after a stressful day? A gym session or brisk 30-minute walk can help. Physical activity stimulates various brain chemicals that may leave you feeling happier and more relaxed. You may also feel better about your appearance and yourself when you exercise regularly, which can boost your confidence and improve your self-esteem. 4. Exercise boosts energy Winded by grocery shopping or household chores? Regular physical activity can improve your muscle strength and boost your endurance. Exercise delivers oxygen and nutrients to your tissues and helps your cardiovascular system work more efficiently. And when your heart and lung health improve, you have more energy to tackle daily chores. Exercise: 7 benefits of regular physical activity You know exercise is good for you, but do you know how good? From boosting your mood to improving your sex life, find out how exercise can improve your life. By Mayo Clinic Staff Want to feel better, have more energy and even add years to your life? Just exercise. The health benefits of regular exercise and physical activity are hard to ignore. Everyone benefits from exercise, regardless of age, sex or physical ability. Need more convincing to get moving? Check out these seven ways exercise can lead to a happier, healthier you. 1. Exercise controls weight Exercise can help prevent excess weight gain or help maintain weight loss. When you engage in physical activity, you burn calories. The more intense the activity, the more calories you burn. Regular trips to the gym are great, but don't worry if you can't find a large chunk of time to exercise every day. To reap the benefits of exercise, just get more active throughout your day — take the stairs instead of the elevator or rev up your household chores. Consistency is key. 2. Exercise combats health conditions and diseases Worried about heart disease? Hoping to prevent high blood pressure? No matter what your current weight, being active boosts high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good," cholesterol and decreases unhealthy triglycerides. This one-two punch keeps your blood flowing smoothly, which decreases your risk of cardiovascular diseases. Regular exercise helps prevent or manage a wide range of health problems and concerns, including stroke, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, depression, a number of types of cancer, arthritis and falls. 3. Exercise improves mood Need an emotional lift? Or need to blow off some steam after a stressful day? A gym session or brisk 30-minute walk can help. Physical activity stimulates various brain chemicals that may leave you feeling happier and more relaxed. You may also feel better about your appearance and yourself when you exercise regularly, which can boost your confidence and improve your self-esteem. 4. Exercise boosts energy Winded by grocery shopping or household chores? Regular physical activity can improve your muscle strength and boost your endurance. Exercise delivers oxygen and nutrients to your tissues and helps your cardiovascular system work more efficiently. And when your heart and lung health improve, you have more energy to tackle daily chores. Article written by Mayo Clinic Staff - Mayo Clinic Staff (n.d.). Exercise: 7 benefits of regular physical activity. Retrieved March 21, 2017, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/exercise/art-20048389 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.health.gov/PAGUIDELINES/guidelines/default.aspx. Accessed Dec. 27, 2013. Physical activity and health. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/health/index.html. Accessed Jan. 13, 2014. Tips to help you get more active. Weight-control Information Network. http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/tips.htm. Accessed Jan. 13, 2014. Peterson DM. Overview of the benefits and risks of exercise. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 13, 2014. Information about flexibility. National Institute on Aging. http://go4life.nia.nih.gov/stay-active-flexibility-info. Accessed Jan. 14, 2014. Rodriguez NR, et al. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Nutrition and athletic performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2009;41:709. McMillian DJ, et al. Dynamic vs. static-stretching warm up: The effect on power and agility performance. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2006;20:492. Laskowski ER (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 15, 2014. McHugh MP, et al. To stretch or not to stretch: The role of stretching in injury prevention and performance. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports. 2010;20:169. Gibala MJ, et al. Physiological adaptations to low-volume, high-intensity interval training in health and disease. The Journal of Physiology. 2012;590:1077.

What to do? What to do?

There are many options and things to consider when thinking about weight loss, getting into shape and losing those bulges of fat and it can be confusing and overwhelming. Figuring out the best way to get your desired body is not an easy process. Actually succeeding is even more difficult. What is right for you? Dieting: Going on a diet is never fun and the weight that comes off is easily put back on once the diet is over. Should you simply count calories, join Weight Watchers / Jenny Craig or join the many people who jump on the Whole-Thirty bandwagon? What about a juice cleanse? Fasting? Go retro with Atkins? Whatever you decide, it is best to talk with your physician before starting any diet or weight loss program. Exercise: Daily exercise is necessary in order to stay healthy but, again, the options are numerous: 1) joining a gym can be expensive but affords you the opportunity to take classes and use a variety of exercise machines for cardio conditioning and multiple weights for muscle building and body toning. 2) independent classes may be appealing: zumba , yoga, spin classes, hot yoga, strength training and even bollywood dancing can make exercise fun. As with dieting, always talk with your doctor before beginning a new exercise program to make sure you are healthy enough to exercise. Surgery: Weight loss and body altering procedures seem to be gaining in popularity and can, in some cases, be a desirable solution. Gastric bypass surgery, tummy tucks and liposuction are only a few options available. These are all invasive and come with risks associated with anesthesia, risk of infection and a period of recovery. Non-surgical Options: A non-surgical, non-invasive option can be the best solutions for individuals who are 30-40 pounds over their goal weight and have pockets of fat that they wish to get rid of permanently. That's right, the results are permanent and CoolSculpting can be the solution you have been looking for. CoolSculpting is non-surgical, non-invasive FDA approved fat-freezing process. This treatment is does not require any downtime - you can even have it done during your lunch hour and then return to work. There is no need to wear compression garments or have anyone drive you home. Yes, it's that easy! One question I hear is “where is the best place to get CoolSculpting?” and my answer is always the same: ThinSculpting. There is no reason to go anywhere else. ThinSculpting is the only facility in the entire Triangle area that focuses solely on CoolSculpting - that's all we do and we are the only facility in the Raleigh - Durham - Chapel Hill area that sends our entire staff to the CoolSculpting Corporate Headquarters in Reston, Virginia for additional, in depth training at the CoolSculpting University. All CoolSculpting providers are definitely not the same! ThinSculpting in Wake Forest and Cary has every applicator, including the newest CoolAdvantage and CoolAdvantage Plus Applicators that are more comfortable, have even better results and sculpt in almost half the time. We offer free consultations that take about thirty minutes where we can provide an assessment, pricing and answer all of your CoolSculpting questions. You have nothing to lose by calling us - except, of course, those pesky pockets of fat!!!

Page 1 of 11